CANADIANS DESERVE A “REAL BUDGET"

 

Budgets are becoming less and less important as policy documents but does anyone really care or does it really matter: certainly not for the Harper government?

Finance Minister Joe Oliver did a 180-degree flip on January 16th.  After much confusion about the impact of the dramatic fall in oil prices, Mr. Oliver announced that the budget would be delayed until after March 31, perhaps to April or even May or maybe even until after the election. There is no legal or constitutional requirement to table a budget.

Read More

DISAPPEARING CREDIBIL.ITY

In last year’s budget, the price of oil was $110 a barrel. In June, the price of a barrel of oil began to fall and by October it was down to close to $80. The government was not at all concerned by this decline or to emerging risks in the global oil market.

 

Indeed the government was so confident that the risks were minimal that in the same month Prime Minister Harper, with great fanfare, announced major tax cuts, including income splitting.

Read More

JOE OLIVEWR HAS A PROBLEM

In last year’s budget, the price of oil was $110 a barrel. In June, the price of a barrel of oil began to fall and by October it was down to close to $80. The government was not at all concerned by this decline or to emerging risks in the global oil market.

 

Indeed the government was so confident that the risks were minimal that in the same month Prime Minister Harper, with great fanfare, announced major tax cuts, including income splitting.

Read More

THE DISAPEARING SURPLUS

 

 

Read More

“BAH” said Fantino; “HUMBUG” said HARPER

 

Hear we are in December, that time of year when families get together to celebrate their shared love; to express thanks for the wellbeing of their families and friends; and, to join together to help those who are suffering, and in need of our help and generosity.

Read More

WHAT IF?

The most important fiscal action taken by the Conservative government after being elected in 2006 was to cut the GST by two points. At the time (and ever since) every credible economist in Canada recommended against it. Was it necessary and are we better or worse off as a result?

Read More